Calibrating My Sight for Liberation
He’s African American—a threat. She’s Mexican—an immigrant, maybe an illegal alien. Her hijab says she is a devout Muslim, a mother of terrorists. His accent marks him as an outsider and thus, suspicious. Our current society shapes our sight of others in ways that are incongruent with the imperatives of Scripture. In days like these I find myself buried in the thickness of Exodus, our primal story of deliverance. It is a narrative about another pharaoh from another time, though…
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#AdoptedBook
Today Adopted: The Sacrament of Belonging is officially released into the world of readers, thinkers and practitioners. This is like a birthday for my book, basically! So here are a few ways you can find out more about my book: 1. Adopted: The Sacrament of Belonging in a Fractured World + Giveaway over at SheLoves Magazine. Shout out to my SheLoves sisters who have supported me the entire way. They created the first space for me to write in public,…
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A Beatitude for the Privileged
“Blessed are you when you give a feast and invite those who cannot repay you; for you will be repaid at the resurrection of the just.” —Luke 14:14 In Luke 14, we find Jesus dining at the house of a well-connected man, a ruler who kept company with the influential and affluent Pharisees. Jesus tells them a parable about seating arrangements at a dinner party, one about the host making evaluations on who gets to sit at the seat of…
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Adopted available for pre-order!
One month from now Adopted: The Sacrament of Belonging in a Fractured World will be released into the wild where readers roam. Why am I so excited about this one book? Because I wrote it! Yes, the past couple of years I have been writing, editing, and collaborating with the good people at Eerdmans (look at their Fall catalog... *swoon*) to give birth to this work. I have been talking to my writing group and a few others incessantly through the…
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The Meek Ones
I’ve been to the land we call holy – and back. Before I boarded my string of flights from Bujumbura to Tel Aviv I spent time reading, reflecting, praying. One shard of Scripture glimmered like the golden Dome of the Rock: The meek shall inherit the land and delight themselves in abundant prosperity. Psalm 37 parses out who will, and will not, have ultimate claim to the land. The wicked and wrathful will not; those who plot against the righteous,…
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Our Meal of Resistance
I first met Debra at our Arizona senator’s office. Our paths crossed again at an ACLU Resistance Training. This time Debra came with her partner, Candy, and shared that for decades, they’ve been organizing to secure their rights and were willing to join with us to continue the work on behalf of others. Truth be told, they offered not only solidarity but a rich education borne out of their experience. After the training session Debra invited me to her resistance…
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Devotions out of the Bread Narratives
This week I've been sharing devotions - and action steps - out of the Bread Narratives of Scripture. Here are all five reflections in one place! MONDAY: Matt. 6:11, our daily bread TUESDAY: Exodus 16:4, bread from heaven WEDNESDAY: Mark 6:41-43, And all ate and were full THURSDAY: Mark 8:14, One loaf on the boat FRIDAY: Mark 6:37, You give them something to eat!   Thanks to Red Letter Christians for inviting me to contribute to Wake Up! You can…
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Hard Work and the New City
It’s hard to imagine newness in the shadow of destruction. In the days after 9/11, we suffered disorientation. How could we think beyond the pile of smoldering rubble, the loss of life and the new insecurity that riddled our national psyche? It was like that after the destruction of the Temple, no one had the capacity to imagine newness in the wake of such catastrophic loss. We feel this sensation more than we realize, more often than we dare to…
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What’s Next
On a Sunday morning one January in 2013, the central marketplace in Burundi exploded into flames. By the day’s end the hub of the local economy melted, ending the livelihood of too many. Dozens of mothers waited at the front gate of our little bank the following morning. They cried, lamenting their loss and fearing their future without inventory or income. My husband opened the gate and mourned with them. It was a day when only lament seemed appropriate. Claude…
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we start at a loss
I am at a loss. In the aftermath of the U.S. election I see the national terrain differently. I see people differently. The veneer is gone. I can’t unsee what’s been revealed. I made time to lament for seven days. Black was all I saw, all I felt, and so all I wore. The grief felt appropriate and yet premature. I retreated to the words of Isaiah, as I often do. (The book of Isaiah is called The Fifth Gospel…
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